Ontario's Historical Plaques 


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Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

Photos and transcription by contributor Wayne Adam - Posted December, 2014

Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

Photo by contributor Wayne Adam - Posted December, 2014

Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

Photo by contributor Wayne Adam - Posted April, 2012

Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

Photo by contributor Wayne Adam - Posted March, 2015

Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception

Photo by contributor Wayne Adam - Posted April, 2012

Plaque Location

The County of Wellington
The City of Guelph
On a low wall on a terrace
opposite the front doors of the church
on Norfolk Street across from Macdonell Street


Coordinates: N 43 32.579 W 80 15.057

Map

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Plaque Text

Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception is an exceptional example of the High Victorian Gothic Revival style, an architectural movement that was international in scope. The design of this church was inspired by Cologne Cathedral. Characteristic of the style are the twin towers, large rose window, pointed windows and an interior plan featuring chapels that radiate from the apse. Constructed in several stages beginning in 1876, the church was designed by Irish-born Joseph Connolly, the principal architect of Catholic churches in late 19th century Ontario.

Related Ontario plaque
Joseph Connolly 1840-1904

More
Information

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Churches

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Guelph Plaques




Here are the visitors' comments for this page.

> Posted December 30, 2014
This federal plaque, with a casting date of 2003, was finally erected over 11 years later, on December 23, 2014.
Inside the church, there is a historical marker to the organ which says: The prestigious Royal Canadian College of Organists has designated our organ as a "Heritage Instrument worthy of special care."
Built in 1919 by the world-renowned organ builders Casavant Fréres of Saint-Hyacinthe, Quebec, this magnificent symphonic pipe organ's oak console contains three 61-key manuals and 33 speaking stops, while the 30-note pedal board has 8 stops. The total number of pipes is 2,547, the longest being 16 feet in length. By combining the Pedal Open Diapason 16' at unison and the Pedal Bourdon 16' at fifth, the Principal 32' is produced. The smallest pipe is the size of a pencil. The 27 various couplers and 25 adjustable combination pistons allow the organist to seamlessly adjust the orchestration without interruption.
Two prominent organists provided the parish with music of inspiration and praise for a combined sixty-six years: Clifford McLelland 1926-1951, and John Marrin 1952-1992.
In 2014 the organ was completely rebuilt and fully restored thanks to funding provided by David E. Kendrick, a parishioner, choir member and local organist.

-Wayne




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